Cellphones Are Ruining Your Memories

Yesterday was my last day of my arduous university education. As I walked down the aisle adorned in a black and maroon gown, I noticed something strange.

Hundreds of parents proudly staring at their accomplished children, but not with their eyes, but through their tiny pixelated camera and cellphone screens.

Through their four-inch screens, they attempt to record and capture every single moment.

We have forgotten how to record treasured moments with our hearts and eyes. Instead of experiencing new delicacies, events, concerts and treasured memories first-hand, we choose to stare into our little screens to record and photograph every moment.

Moments are once in a lifetime

Why does time seamlessly pass as we age? Because somewhere along the line we forgot to savor the current moment.

We have become so caught up in capturing and immortalizing these experiences to share with our friends and family, that we forgot to immortalize them in our hearts.

Our memories of events are distant blurs because we never really experienced them. We view our most treasured memories through LCD screens.

We forget that moments can never truly last forever unless we experience them first-hand. Through human experience, they are immortalized.

When we proudly share our feelings of the moment they are solidified in our memories.

There will never be another university graduation, first birthday party or concert, the exact same as the previous one. These little moments, the minor alterations, are what makes our memories memorable.

No amount of recapping through our cellphones and cameras will make us relive that memory.

Truly savoring the moment first-hand is the unparalleled power of human experience. Truly being able to see, hear and feel the emotion and intensity in a room is what creates true memories.

Use technology sparingly

There is a fine line between excessive use and under-use. Everything in life is a spectrum. Too much technology limits the creation of true memories, while no technology reduces the ability to share our experiences.

We shouldn’t destroy our cellphones and revert back to the Stone Age. But we also shouldn’t use technology as a placeholder for the human experience.

We understand our devices are important for contacting loved ones, scheduling, recording memories and occasionally playing Clash of Clans. But that line is severely crossed when we spend the majority of a would-be treasured event experiencing it through four-inch screens.

So before we indulge in breath-taking food, enjoy our favorite musicians, or experience once-in-a-lifetime events, let us be wary of our devices, be grateful for the moment and begin to truly appreciate all that surrounds us.

Until next time, my beautiful readers,

Be bold, be free, and love on.

29 thoughts on “Cellphones Are Ruining Your Memories

  1. I couldn’t agree with you more. I was just telling my sister yesterday about going to Jack London square in Oakland with several family members. At one point, everyone had their phones out, and all were taking pictures of one another taking pictures of one another.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much for the reblog! Your love and support really means the world to us, and more particularly me!

      We are tremendously appreciative of the support you offer to our little community!

      Like

      1. Hey Leroy, it was an important point, one that as a pastor who had to “educate” about electronic devices in worship, it was a great point. One of those “how come I didn’t write that” points! Thanks and great job. Keep it up, I’m looking to rip off more stuff. God bless

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  2. I was lucky to grow in an age when parents watched their children grow up without distractions of cell phones. I see so many couples even friends at lunch or dinner paying attention to their cell phones instead of each other.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Ugh, that hurts a lot! We should be paying more attention to our children instead of the cellphone games. Savouring the moment with our kids instead of being hyper-connected with strangers on instagram and facebook.

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    1. Thank you so much for the reblog! Your love and support really means the world to us, and more particularly me!

      We are tremendously appreciative of the support you offer to our little community!

      Like

    1. Well, cellphones and technology are completely integrated with society. As society progress, so will technology. We can’t fight that. But, we must just be mindful of where attention and minds go when we are creating and enjoying our lives: to our cellphones or towards our memories.

      Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much for the reblog! Your love and support really means the world to us, and more particularly me!

      We are tremendously appreciative of the support you offer to our little community!

      Liked by 1 person

  3. totally agree! I love taking picture at concerts, but I only take pictures during a song or two so I don’t lose the experience of the moment. I rarely take video because it just ruins the experience for me.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. You have a valid point there. It’s all in the balance and looking up on a regular base. Use it but don’t over use it. Look up from the screen look beyond the screen and let the event settle in as well. Beautiful post!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. “He that outlives this day, and comes safe home,
    Will stand a tip-toe when the day is named,
    And rouse him at the name of Crispian.
    He that shall live this day, and see old age,
    Will yearly on the vigil feast his neighbours,
    And say ‘To-morrow is Saint Crispian:’
    Then will he strip his sleeve and show his scars.
    And say ‘These wounds I had on Crispian’s day.’
    Old men forget: yet all shall be forgot,
    But he’ll remember,with advantages,
    What feats he did that day.”

    This quote is from Shakespeare’s Henry V, in the English Camp before they storm the walls of the French king’s castle on St. Crispian’s Day. The phrase, ‘with advantages’, means the old men will exaggerate their deeds. I have decided, before I pull out my device to fuss with it and lose the moment, to remember it ‘with advantages’ in my dotage. Thanks for posting.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. I definitely try to remind myself of this, but I find it hard sometimes especially as a blogger. I like to have pictures to share on my blogs, but at the same time, I don’t want to miss out on experiencing the event because I was too busy snapping photos!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much for the reblog! Your love and support really means the world to us, and more particularly me!

      We are tremendously appreciative of the support you offer to our little community!

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Last year I visited San Diego and went whale watching. I consciously made the decision to not take any pictures and simply experience these amazing creatures without any interference. I am glad that I did. I find that when I revisit the experience, my memory is actually more vivid.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. That’s great Edwin! Your memory is more vivid because you spent more time in awe of the experience, rather than trying to capture the moment to share with others. We should all follow suite and start taking the same approach!

      Liked by 1 person

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