3 Lessons From Our Mothers

If you had to clean up someones poop, puke, and pee, or had to listen to them cry and scream at all hours of day and night, you probably wouldn’t stand this person for very long.

Well, your mother went through that and a whole lot more for a very long time to make sure that you survived and became the slightly less poop and pee covered person that you are today.

Our mothers not only took care of us when we were disgusting and unruly, they also taught us a lot of the most important lessons we’ve ever learned.

We will never be able to repay our mothers, but at the very least we can say thank you every once and a while.

So this is an ode to the lessons our mothers have taught us, and a thank you note to all the amazing mothers out there.

We are born of love; love is our mother.
-Rumi

Sharing Is Caring

I grew up in a male dominated house. Needless to say, the boys of the house wanted to solve every conflict aggressively and had a hard time sharing anything. Whether it was time on the computer, toys, or treats, we wanted everything to ourselves.

But mothers will always step in and set it straight. She showed us the value of sharing our things, and thus our happiness, with others.

She also taught us this lesson through her everyday life. I frequently saw my mother pay for strangers, offer to pay for everyone in our group, and give presents at every opportunity.

She taught us that money comes and goes, but the impact that a small gesture can have on someone will last forever.

Give Everyone A Fair Shake

No matter who you were, if you came into contact with my mother she would give you the benefit of the doubt.

If everyone in the world was like this there would be no more sexism, racism, or any other of the prejudice diseases that plague humanity. When you treat each person as an individual and assume only the best of them—until they prove otherwise—you make the world a fairer place.

The media will try to convince you of a whole myriad of ignorant stereotypes, but the lessons from our mothers will always outweigh them and for that I am grateful.

Because of our mothers we know that each person is unique and deserves a fair chance.

Don’t Let The Opinions Of Others Affect You

My mother is a bus driver. She has told me many horror stories and she has been called every name in the book.

She’s been put down or attacked so many times that you’d lose count, but she never let the opinions of others affect her opinion of herself.

Sometimes it would get to her, but seeing the strength and determination that she mustered up during those moments was inspiring.

I learned that other people can only affect you as much as you let them affect you and this is one of the most important lessons a person can learn.

When I think of the mothers of the world I think about determination, unconditional love, overcoming obstacles, and doing things you never thought you’d do because you love that little life more than anything in the whole world.

Raising you was the hardest thing someone ever had to do in their entire life. So today, take the time to thank them. This is for all the mothers out there.

I love you mum. Thank for putting up with all the poop, the pee, the aggression, the rebellion, the shortcomings and the times I didn’t appreciate you like I should have.

I’ve finally learned my lessons.

What are some of the lessons that your mother taught you? Leave them in the comments!

14 thoughts on “3 Lessons From Our Mothers

  1. Mothers have borne us through nine long months of a glorious, terribly laborious gestation displaced by irrevocable physical changes. Who among all mothers does not admit to having terrified thoughts, at least once, during that hiatus in life regarding the daunting prospect ahead.

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    1. Love you so much Steven Farquharson, This brought tears to my eyes. I am so proud of you and what you have accomplished in your life so far. You have overcome so much in such a comparably short time. I wish only that you do everything to the best of your ability and treat others how you would expect them to treat you.

      Love you
      Mum

      Liked by 3 people

  2. Love this post! My mom has always been my biggest supporter. She taught me to appreciate my strengths, work hard to improve my weaknesses, and to not give up on my dreams. 🙂

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  3. Good article.

    Also…

    I want to highlight that the tasks that a mom does aren’t skills that a woman is born with. A woman, once a mom, has to learn the skills and accept the perspective that a mom uses on a daily basis. The world view is patience and you also have to clean up after dependent human beings 😛 .

    I say this because Motherhood has to be earned.

    Societal opinion can praise women as mothers. But all of use can’t be misguided about all women once they’re moms.

    So there are women who birth babies, and don’t value these children that they had birthed. Or there are women who won’t like being an adult responsible for a baby, or for a young child.

    These few women actually resent their baby and young child. And they say their resentment through words and through actions towards those kids.

    So they abuse the babies and young children who have no choice but to be dependent on that mother. And these aren’t actions done by postpartum depression. The women are well out of the postpartum year.

    I only say this so as to be mindful that Motherhood is a lifestyle that is learned by choice.

    The attitude to be a responsible adult for dependent human beings is not ingrained as a trait that a woman is born with.

    So praise the women who really work and try, and don’t make any excuse for the women who resent, abuse through many ways, the children that they had birthed.

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    1. Auto correct struck again!

      I made a typo.

      Good article.

      Also…

      I want to highlight that the tasks that a mom does aren’t skills that a woman is born with. A woman, once a mom, has to learn the skills and accept the perspective that a mom uses on a daily basis. The world view is patience and you also have to clean up after dependent human beings 😛 .

      I say this because Motherhood has to be earned.

      Societal opinion can praise women as mothers. But all of *Us* can’t be misguided about all women once they’re moms.

      So there are women who birth babies, and don’t value these children that they had birthed. Or there are women who won’t like being an adult responsible for a baby, or for a young child.

      These few women actually resent their baby and young child. And they say their resentment through words and through actions towards those kids.

      So they abuse the babies and young children who have no choice but to be dependent on that mother. And these aren’t actions done by postpartum depression. The women are well out of the postpartum year.

      I only say this so as to be mindful that Motherhood is a lifestyle that is learned by choice.

      The attitude to be a responsible adult for dependent human beings is not ingrained as a trait that a woman is born with.

      So praise the women who really work and try, and don’t make any excuse for the women who resent, and abuse through many ways, the children that they had birthed.

      Like

  4. One of the many things my Mom taught me was never to judge people or reject people by outward appearances. If the classmate was a little dirty and no one would hold her hand for the circle games, then let me be the one to do so. If that lady my Mom helped with housework was overweight and smelled a little, let’s do what we can to help make her life more comfortable and enjoyable…….and so on.

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  5. Thanks for such a lovely post. My Mom was very thoughtful and kept a calendar with everyone’s birthday and anniversary on it then would send cards. I do the same even though it is rare these days for people to send cards in the mail. She also made a big deal of birthdays and I continued that trend with my family. Although she had her hands full helping with my Dad’s business and dealing with how sick I was growing up, she still found time to do volunteer work, too. I love the example she set.

    Like

  6. My mom always says, “It’s not about what you say but what you don’t say.” It was great advice for all situations but especially for disagreements. Saying hurtful things can never be taken back. It changed the way I approach any conversation.

    Liked by 1 person

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